Archive | May, 2015

SEX (now that I have your attention)…

18 May

SEX (now that I have your attention)….

SEX (now that I have your attention)…

18 May

All sexuals are equal. Some are just more equal than others.

We are all sexual creatures of some ilk. Male and female created He them. Whether one believes in intelligent design or crazy chaos, that’s the easy part: the black and white, the yin and yang, the yes and no. But nothing’s really that easy. There are more than 50 shades of gray, more maybes than yes and no. At least that’s how it seems to me.

I’m a doctor, but not that kind of doctor. Certainly not a Sex Doctor, and certainly not like Dr. Ruth or Dr. Phil or whoever is in vogue these days. As they say, the higher one climbs the education ladder, the more one knows about less and less. The less and less part is becoming more and more apparent as I get older. But, as I age, the more and more I think I understand about life and living and who I am. Whoever that is. Ok, maybe I don’t know any more, but I’m just more comfortable with not knowing.

I don’t claim to be an expert on very many things and certainly not on the subject of homosexuality. I don’t know if it, like life, begins at conception or if environment plays a role. Probably a little of both. I don’t know if anyone would choose to be gay, if given the choice, or not. I’m not even sure where I slide on the 0 to 6 Kinsey Scale. Probably, like most people, somewhere in between.

I believe that God (yes, God) created male and female primarily for two purposes: 1) procreation (so the Creator wouldn’t have to populate the world by making mud figures every seven days) and 2) companionship—God’s and ours. Those who procreate maybe provide all the companionship they need. Those of us who don’t maybe need to find it somewhere else. Life can certainly provide strange bedfellows, so to speak. Currently, I am content with the furry four-legged kind—for companionship, that is; we certainly don’t even consider procreation (though if I could have kittens, I might have a litter)—but it’s definitely not in our nature.

I also believe what’s natural is generally the best way. If it fits, you must commit (or something like that). As the song says (in spite of its poor grammar), “if it don’t fit, don’t force it; just relax and let it go.” I mean, there’s a reason things are made the way they are. And, yes, I still believe in reasons, in spite of all the inexplicable chaos swirling around us. I have a Touchstone, kind of like “Base” or “Home” when playing Tag or Hide and Seek—a rock, an anchor, if you will, that keeps me centered, (for the most part) calm, primarily positive and optimistic in a way that is even more inexplicable to those around me than the chaos they readily concede. It’s a peace that truly passes understanding.  I like that, because I don’t have to try to figure it out.  I can just Be.

I recognize anomalies. Diversions, perversions, in and out of the box, and all that. Mistakes are made (so I’m told), but one man’s ceiling is another’s floor, so who’s to say which is up and which is down. Alice certainly had a hard time wrapping her elongated head around it. I don’t know if what is normal is just more predictable or probable. For example, I have the most common type of blood—O+ I think—but that doesn’t deny the As and ABs, just because they are more rare; the negatives, just because mine’s positive. I embrace the differences, celebrate multiculturalism, prefer the unique over the commonplace most of the time. I even received a Diversity Award; it’s hanging on my office wall, if anyone needs proof.

I don’t believe the tail should wag the dog, not in a democracy. Majority rules, but it shouldn’t rule with an iron hand. I do believe any percentage of the population deserves the same rights as the rest, regardless of how small or different. That’s America, land that I love, and I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

But bigger and better than America, land of the free, is the Kingdom of God where there is no male nor female (gay nor straight), black nor white, Jew nor Gentile. We are all equal in the eyes of God: equally sinners, yet equally forgiven. More than equally loved beyond all measure, inexplicably so. That’s certainly worth embracing, even if it passes comprehension.

As an educated scholar, I know what the Bible has to say about homosexuality—I’ve researched it, from Old to New Testament, Greek to English. What is direct and what is interpretation, what is black and white and what is gray, who’s to say—maybe someone else can and will, but not I. I leave that up to the Source itself. When Jesus forgave the woman caught in sin and sent her accusers (who were not without sin) away without throwing a stone, he had a private conversation with her. “Neither do I condemn you,” he said when they were alone, adding, “Go and sin no more.” If gays are sinning, that’s between them and God; if they are to go and sin no more, let them hear it from God themselves. IF they are listening; that effort has to be theirs. Whether or not one can help being the way one is pales, I think, when one considers what pleases Almighty God. That’s a daily task, an individual quest, if we’re really serious about hearing God’s voice and placing priority on following the direction of the Holy Spirit.

But make no mistake (as someone who makes a lot of them is fond of saying): there’s no ambiguity about the Gospel—the Good News for Everyone. As for Christians, gay or straight, if we are listening, then none of us can help but hear the proclamation: “God so loved the world.” And if we continue to listen even with half an ear, the subsequent commandment comes through loud and clear: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and soul and mind and love your neighbor as yourself.” Later, John even reduced the sermon to just three words: “Love one another.”

So this is what I do know for sure: we are all loved. We are, in return, to love everyone else. That’s what makes us all more equal than others.

End of story.